Sustainability in Scandinavia: SUST Major Shannon Conway Reports on Her Summer 2015 Study Abroad Experience

During the summer of 2015, several Roosevelt University students majoring in Sustainability Studies have been doing internships or pursuing study abroad opportunities in various locales around the world, from Chicago to Hawaii and from Schaumburg to Scandinavia. We’ve invited them to write up reports from the field on their activities, adventures, and advocacy work in the service of environmental conservation, sustainable development, and social justice.

Here’s the second of these student blog posts, from Shannon Conway, a senior SUST major who took a class on glaciology and climate change through a study abroad program in Denmark that included a week-long field study session in Iceland.

SUST major Shannon Conway in Copenhagen, Denmark, Summer 2015

SUST major Shannon Conway in Copenhagen, Denmark, Summer 2015

This summer, I had the amazing opportunity to study at the Danish Institute for Study Abroad (DIS) in Copenhagen, Denmark, with a field-based tour of Iceland’s southern coast. This three-week, three-credit course revolved around Iceland’s glaciers and how they’re being altered by climate change. What attracted me to this course was the semi-short duration of the course, the locations, and of course, glaciers! For as long as I can remember I have been a creature of the cold. Snow, ice, and anything that has to do with cold temperatures intrigues me. I have always wanted to study abroad but thought that an entire semester was a little much, so this three-week program suited my schedule.

Student life at DIS was unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. My housing and classroom were both centered directly in the heart of Copenhagen, making it easy to familiarize myself with the city. I lived in Kannikestræde with about 30 other American students who came from all around the country; my actual roommate, Lea, was from Hawaii. There were about 10 different courses throughout these three weeks, all with different study tours.

Living in Copenhagen was quite the cultural shift from living in Chicago. Most of the roads were cobblestone, the buildings did not exceed four stories, and it rained basically everyday for at least an hour. The Danes are very reserved people, but their daring fashion choices definitely make a statement. It was very easy to pick out the American in the crowd just by looking at what they were wearing, considering we all looked like tourists compared to them.

The name of the course I took was called Climate Change and Glacier Modeling. My professor, Susanne Lilja Buchardt, is a native Dane who lives in Iceland for half of the year with her family. She is a brilliant glaciologist and has worked in the field for over ten years. In the course, we focused on the impacts of climate change and how it’s altering everyday life in Iceland, Antarctica, Greenland, and essentially the entire world. Though only a small percentage of glaciers are located in Iceland, they are vital to study since they’re being affected first due to their smaller ice volume. The first week of my course was spent in the classroom in Copenhagen from 9:00am to 1:00pm where we discussed how glaciers form, shift, and flow. This whole week was a preparation for our Iceland study tour.

The second week of class, we packed our bags and headed to Reykjavik, Iceland, for a week-long study tour. Arriving in Iceland almost felt like we were landing on Mars. The terrain was covered with dark lava rocks, some covered in a thick moss which looked like coral. There were snow covered mountains to my right, the Atlantic Ocean to my left, and lava rocks between. Reykjavik is the country’s capital where 95% of the population lives, which is about 130,000 people, and where we stayed for the majority of the trip. Every day we would get on our tour bus at 8:00am and head to different geological sites.

Day 1: We visited the Icelandic Meteorologist Office and attended a presentation from a well-known local glaciologist. Here, we received a brief rundown on volcanoes, glaciers, and climate.

My class took these super-sized trucks up the Langjökull glacier. The driver would let almost all the air out of the tires in order to disperse weight evenly up the mountain. If they did not do that, the truck would get stuck in the ice.

My class took these super-sized trucks up the
Langjökull glacier. The driver would let almost all
the air out of the tires in order to disperse weight
evenly up the mountain. If they did not do that,
the truck would get stuck in the ice.

Day 2: My class and I went to the Volcano House where we listened to a presentation about Iceland’s most historical volcano eruptions. Then we headed over to the earliest known settlement in Iceland and toured the artifacts and housing found there.

Day 3: First, we visited Deildartunguhver, the most powerful hot spring in Iceland and Europe, where water was above boiling point and was spewing out of the ground. Then we went to Hraunfossar waterfalls. They are a series of water flows coming down from ice melt, flowing over a lava field.

Later that day we headed southeast to the Langjökull Glacier where we were taken to the top on an old army truck with wheels almost taller than me. At the top, we went on an “Into The Glacier” tour. Glaciologists have carved a mile-long tunnel through the middle of the glacier. We went about 200 feet into the center. Each line of ice had a piece of history to it, whether it was a darker layer of ash from a volcano or a skinny layer of ice from a dry season. It was truly incredible to be in this ice tunnel.

Inside the Langjökull glacier where there are visible lines of history. Theses are formed from seasons, melting, accumulation, and volcanic eruptions (S. Conway, June 2015)

Inside the Langjökull glacier where there are visible lines of history. Theses are formed from seasons, melting, accumulation, and volcanic eruptions (S. Conway, June 2015)

Day 4: We left our hotel for the night and headed to the Burfell Hydropower Station. Water flows down from the mountains, into rivers, and down another slope in order for energy to be captured. Burfell is unique because of its ice-catching system at the mouth of the river. If there are ice chunks from the glacier melt, they will be stopped before flowing into the plant.

After this visit, we went to the Hekla Volcano Center. Hekla is one of the most active volcanoes in Iceland, with the past seven eruptions averaging every 10 years. When I was there, it was 4 years overdue. After Hekla we traveled to the city of Vik which is right on the coast of the Atlantic. If climate change continues to make sea level rise, Vik will no longer be here in the next century. The only way Vik could survive, oddly enough, is if the Katla volcano erupts, creating more land mass.

After Vik, we went to the beautiful waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss, then to Kirkjubæjarklaustur where the earth is cut in half with a river running through. At the end of the day we ended up at Hotel Laki.

The waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss. There was a path we walked completely around the backside of this waterfall. And got soaked.

The waterfalls of Seljalandsfoss. There was a path we walked completely around the backside of this waterfall. And got soaked.

Svínafellsjökull Glacier hike, the Ice Explorer guide leading us, followed by my professor.

Svínafellsjökull Glacier hike, the Ice Explorer guide leading us, followed by my professor (S. Conway, June 2015)

Day 5: We traveled with the Ice Explorers to Skaftafell National Park where we took our ice picks and boot spikes on a hike up Svínafellsjökull glacier. Since it was summer, the glacier had retreated a great deal and there were massive cracks in the ice with no visible ending. Each step was to be taken with extreme caution.

After the glacier hike, we traveled to the iconic glacial lagoon in Breidamerkurlon. The lagoon was formed only 80 years ago due to warming temperatures. Sublet-glaciers from the Vatnajökull glacier melt into this lagoon, bringing giant chunks of ice down with it. In the lagoon, the pieces of fallen glaciers become icebergs in a way, and flow out to the shores of the Atlantic.

 

Glacier Lagoon being fed by sublet-glaciers from the Vatnajökull Glacier. This lagoon was formed only 80 years ago. It is astonishing what climate change and rising temperatures can do.

Glacier Lagoon being fed by sublet-glaciers from the Vatnajökull Glacier. This lagoon was formed only 80 years ago. It is astonishing what climate change and rising temperatures can do.

Day 6: This day was used as a relaxing traveling day, but was just as memorable as the others. We headed back to Reykjavik where we went swimming at the Blue Lagoon. The Blue Lagoon is a hot springs which was formed about 50 years ago by mistake. Engineers at the local geothermal power plant did not know what to do with the excess water they created, so they dumped it in a nearby lava field. It was full of sulfite and other natural chemicals, but was not toxic to humans. Because of where the water got dumped, the natural geothermal energy from the earth heated the excess water, creating a hot spring. Now, it has become a huge tourist attraction for Iceland.

Group photo of my class while retreating down the Svínafellsjökull Glacier. The weather was unusually hot and we needed to take off many layers of clothing. My professor, an expert glaciologist, claimed that was the warmest glacier hike she had ever been on.

Group photo of my class while retreating down the Svínafellsjökull Glacier. The weather was unusually hot and we needed to take off many layers of clothing. My professor, an expert glaciologist, claimed that was the warmest glacier hike she had ever been on.

Reflecting back on my trip, I can truly say this is one of the best experiences I have ever had. Not only was it a cultural and social learning experience, but also a huge eye-opener in terms of sustainability.

Shannon Conway in Iceland, June 2015

Shannon Conway in Iceland, June 2015

Without being there first-hand to witness what is happening to these glaciers and to the surrounding geography, I would not be able to fathom the rate at which climate change is impacting them. By seeing the ice physically flow down into the ocean, ice chunks plummeting into the pools of water, and Icelandic natives concerned about flooding in their cities, I realized how important the practice of sustainability is in our world.

This trip was much like an awakening to me and what I stand for, what I study, what I practice, and what I should do differently. Much of what we do in our everyday lives is impacting the globe somewhere else. After being in Iceland, I now know how big of an impact that really is.

All in all, I could not be happier about my decision to study abroad this summer and I hope other students will see what a great experience this was and want to make a study abroad trip themselves.

Text written and photos provided by Roosevelt University SUST major Shannon Conway, August 2015

 

Posted in activities, climate change, conservation, education, field trips, Roosevelt, science, students, water | Leave a comment

Microcosm in Alaska: August 2015 Update

This guest post is by Michele Hoffman Trotter, SUST adjunct professor at Roosevelt University and director/co-producer of the Microcosm film project. Here Michele relates new developments on filming, research, and fundraising for this exciting interdisciplinary endeavor as of this summer and as the Microcosm team heads into the Fall of 2015.

Steller sea lions (M. Hoffman)

Steller sea lions (M. Hoffman)

This summer brought Microcosm to the great state of Alaska to meet with a dozen scientists from around the world who work in what is probably the most unique physical environment on Earth. With the state of Alaska covering a geographic range the size of Texas, California, and Montana combined, there is a vast and diverse coastal space to go along with it. Economically the Alaskan waters support one of the largest fisheries in North America and many lives and livelihoods depend on the biological productivity that the scientists at University of Alaska devote their lives to studying.

The Peterson Glacier in Alaska (M. Hoffman)

The Peterson Glacier in Alaska (M. Hoffman)

Water currents, temperature, and ice are the trifecta combination of variables that impact the size and distribution of many resident populations in Alaskan waters, but it is this third one (the ice) that really sets this environment apart. With ice cover creating a frigid and sunless environment, the species adapted to live there are highly specialized and many are extremophiles in the truest sense.  As ice cover melts, new areas of ocean become accessible to scientists, and new species are routinely discovered as a result.

Dr. Anne-Lize Ducluzeau examining Arctic bacteria, some of which are bioluminescent (M. Hoffman)

Dr. Anne-Lize Ducluzeau examining Arctic bacteria, some of which are bioluminescent (M. Hoffman)

Also profound is the intricate relationship between some of the microorganisms and the physical ice structures. During respiration, organisms that inhabit the ice (yes there are ice-cosms!) emit a sort of slime coat that actually helps facilitate ice growth! In addition, the presence of these living communities in ice helps divert ice melt because melt water must flow around them like the obstacles in a pinball machine.  When ice melt can flow in a straight line it tends to melt at a faster rate.

Another aspect of melting ice (and, yes, the seasonal ice cover is diminishing so no doubt about climate change up here, folks) is that species not previously found in Arctic waters are making their way in.  This is what they refer to as shifting baselines and although there will be winners and losers in the shifting economy of the Arctic ecosystem, it is really too early to say what the results might look like.  In other words, the science community is reluctant to label anything good or bad — rather, we speak in terms of changes, shifts, and the establishment of new baselines.

Dr. Anne-Lize Ducluzeau examining a carnivorous pteropod (M. Hoffman)

Dr. Anne-Lize Ducluzeau examining a carnivorous pteropod (M. Hoffman)

As filmmakers and researchers, we were so enthralled with ice that we decided we needed to spend some time in it!  For three days we went out into the Kenai Peninsula to camp and kayak among the glaciers and while it was beautiful, it was not easy! The rainfall never stopped!  This should not, however, be surprising as this part of Alaska is a rain forest, and while it was wet and freezing cold, it was beyond beautiful. In three days there was no sight of humans other than our party of four.  Our company consisted of harbor seals, Steller sea lions, humpback whales, puffins, otters — and, of course, the iconic glaciers.  Otherworldly is an understatement, and the challenge of this environment is humbling to say the least.

It also needs to be said that Ryan Trotter (8yr old son of Michele Hoffman Trotter and youngest member of team Microcosm) is the youngest person to have ever achieved a multi-day kayaking trip in the glaciers with Kayak Adventures Worldwide. Go Ryan!

Michele, Annie, and the crew at Microcosm
www.microcosmfilm.com

Posted in arts, biodiversity, climate change, conservation, ecology, education, faculty, research, Roosevelt, science, students, water | Leave a comment

Obama Announces Clean Power Plan to Fight Climate Change

Over the past few days, President Obama has announced new climate change-related policies that utilizes the Clean Air Act of 1970 to enforce tougher standards on GHG-emitting power plants, such as the many aging coal-fired power plants that still supply electricity to citizens in Illinois and throughout the nation.

 

More details of the announcement from the White House on 3 Aug 2015 can be found in this Fact Sheet, which links climate change policy to the protection of public health and national security. Unsurprisingly, Obama’s announcement has spurred a critical response from Republican legislators, especially those from states which rely heavily on coal for power generation — opposition which has been long planned since the President signaled he would move significantly on climate change mitigation policy back in 2013.

While sure to create a political and legal battle for the next several years, the President’s announcement assures the public he is serious about curtailing GHG emissions in the US, and puts climate change front and center in the upcoming presidential election debates of 2015-16. For more information, see the Clean Power Plan page on the EPA’s website.

Posted in climate change, energy, news, policy, pollution

RU Environmental Sustainability Internship (Chicago Campus) Open for Applications

RU's restored prairie and part of its urban forest at the Schaumburg Campus (photo: M. Radeck)

RU’s restored prairie and part of its urban forest at the Schaumburg Campus (photo: M. Radeck)

The RU Physical Resources Department is offering a paid student internship position for the 2015-16 academic year. This job is an outstanding professional development opportunity and involves working directly with the RU Physical Resources Team under the direction of Paul Matthews, Associate VP for Campus Planning/Operations. The internship is based primarily at the Chicago Campus, Applications are being accepted ASAP (see details below) until the position is filled. Duties and responsibilities include:

  • Assist in implementing the newly adopted Sustainability Strategic Plan, approved in Spring 2015
  • Maintenance and updating of the RU Green Campus website, Green Campus Blog, and associated Facebook page, including articulating a mission statement, information on topics such as green construction and recycling programs, provide links to outside environmental organizations, post sustainability-related news, and provide other information which may benefit and educate the RU community about environmental sustainability.
  • Contribute to the management of the WB Rooftop Garden
  • Assist in maintaining contact with associations and government sponsored agencies that support the Physical Resources Environmental Sustainability Initiatives, including: Association for the Advancement for Sustainability within Higher Education (AASHE), United States Green Building Council, Second Nature, World Wildlife Federation, EPA Green Power Partnership Program, and the Illinois Governor’s Campus Sustainability Compact
  • Participate in DCEO Recycling Grant Reporting; Recycling Project for AUD, Field House, and Wabash (with 50% diversion goal); and university Compost Agreement, which provides materials for Schaumburg Garden Plots
  • Help prepare PowerPoint presentations on select ES topics to present to the RU Community when necessary.
  • Attend RU-based meetings that deal with the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) Leadership thru Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification Program for the Wabash Vertical Campus, Field House, and other major construction projects. Assist in tracking the LEED credits for certification and green building construction, and in achieving USGBC LEED Silver level for Field House.
  • Work on Physical Resource plans or initiatives that center around green technologies, landscapes, hardscapes, alternate methods of transportation, and renewable energy sources.

To Indicate Interest and Get More Information: Contact Rebecca Quesnell, Sustainability Operations Coordinator, Department of Physical Resources, Roosevelt University, at 312-341-3600 (office) or rquesnell@roosevelt.edu (email). To Apply:

  • Open this link: https://roosevelt-csm.symplicity.com/  
  • Log-in by using your student I.D. number for your username and password
  • Click on “On-Campus Jobs”
  • Click on “Environmental Sustainability Student Associate – Chicago”
  • Apply

This is a new system for student employment, so if you encounter any problems please email Career Services at career@roosevelt.edu, and put “Career Central Help” in the subject line. 

Applicants are encouraged to apply as soon as possible to facilitate paperwork completion prior to the state of the Fall semester; also note that even if you previously uploaded your cover letter and resume to the old system, you will most likely have to re-upload it to this new system.

Posted in education, green jobs, internships, Roosevelt, students

Sustainability at the Field Museum: SUST Major Laura Miller Hill Reports on Her Summer Internship

During the summer of 2015, several Roosevelt University students majoring in Sustainability Studies have been doing internships or pursuing study abroad opportunities in various locales around the world, from Chicago to Hawaii and from Schaumburg to Scandinavia. Over the new several weeks, we’ll post their reports from the field on their activities, adventures, and advocacy work in the service of environmental conservation, sustainable development, and social justice.

Here’s the first of these student blog posts, from Laura Miller Hill, a senior SUST major who is interning at Chicago’s world-renowned Field Museum along beautiful Lake Michigan.

The Field Museum’s Edible Treasures Garden and friend (photo: L. Miller Hill 2015)

The Field Museum’s Edible Treasures Garden and friend (photo: L. Miller Hill 2015)

This summer I have been working with Sustainability Manager Carter O’Brien as a Keller Science Action intern at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. My primary job is to take facts, stories and general information regarding sustainability initiatives throughout the museum and consolidate them into webpages that are both educational and easily understood by people who visit the Museum’s A Greener Field website.

During my time as an intern, I have met and interviewed many interesting people around the Chicago area who are instrumental in making the Museum more sustainable. From my interviews I have learned how to initiate and sustain the composting of food waste, the steps needed to start a workplace food garden, how to establish native landscaping on a large scale, and the steps involved in transforming the food service industry into one that relies on local foods and produces zero food waste.

Miller Hill blog image 1bBefore I even began my internship, I was invited to participate in my first meeting of A Greener Field, the Museum’s green team and the driving force for sustainability initiatives at the Museum. A Greener Field began in 1989 to promote recycling at a grass-roots level, and now has over 50 members representing every area of the Museum. The team provides an outlet for staff to share the successes they have had and the challenges they have faced when trying to make their departments more sustainable. It is also used as a way for staff to initiate and help implement museum-wide sustainability programs. Under the guidance of Carter O’Brien and the A Greener Field team, the Museum has made great strides in energy and water conservation and the reduction of waste throughout the Museum, and in the process helped the Museum earn Gold LEED Certification.

Southern portion of Northerly Island, Spring 2015 (photo: L. Miller Hill)

Southern portion of Northerly Island, Spring 2015 (photo: L. Miller Hill)

I was also invited to join Carter, museum scientists, and our own Professor Mike Bryson on a tour of the southern half of Northerly Island led by members of the Army Corps of Engineers. This was an exciting opportunity for me, as this 40-acre portion of the “island” (actually a peninsula created as part of the 1909 Daniel Burnham Plan of Chicago) is not yet open to the public. Our group was able to see the restoration work that the Army Corps and the Chicago Park District are doing to turn a former airport into a wildlife habitat that will be accessible to the public through trails and boardwalks throughout the site. Regrading of the island will provide birds with hills and the visual topography to help them land and avoid flying into large buildings in the area. The addition of a pond and the creation of a deeper wetland will provide an estuary for non-game species of fish, and a habitat that will remain wet during dry periods for birds traveling along the migratory Lake Michigan flyway.

Photo: L. Miller Hill, 2015

Photo: L. Miller Hill, 2015

The tour of Northerly Island and my meeting with A Greener Field helped me realize how instrumental the Field Museum is in acting as a sustainability leader and preserving biodiversity in the Chicago region. Although we tend to think of the Museum primarily as a protector of rain forests and as a collector of artifacts from archeological sites all over the world, along with government entities, citizen groups and other non-profit organizations, the Museum also plays a significant role in protecting natural habitats in our own backyard. I am very much looking forward to my role in documenting how Field Museum staff are working together to reduce their own ecological footprint and the processes an educational science institution must go through to change the way society thinks about and interacts with the natural environments we live and work in every day.

Laura Miller Hill M15Laura Miller Hill is a returning adult undergraduate student at Roosevelt University, where she is a senior Sustainability Studies major. She is spending her summer working as a Keller Science Action Center intern at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago under the supervision of Sustainability Manager Carter O’Brien. Miller Hill’s primary job is to take facts, stories and general information regarding sustainability initiatives throughout the museum and consolidate them into webpages that are both educational and easily understood by people who visit the Museum’s A Greener Field website. She also authored this waste and environmental justice essay about Town of Pines, Indiana, on the Schaumburg’s Sustainable Future website.

Posted in activities, biodiversity, climate change, conservation, education, food, museums, Roosevelt, science, students

RU Sustainability Efforts Profiled in Chicago Tribune, LA Times, and ChicagoInno Articles

Roosevelt’s sustainability efforts, plans, and accomplishments have been getting a good amount of positive press lately in the wake of the university’s releasing its first Strategic Sustainability Plan in June.

Back on June 12th, reporter Paulina Firozi published a front-page article in the RChicago Tribune entitled “Rooftop Farms Appealing, But Will They Catch On?” that discussed green rooftops, gardens, and farming in the Windy City. The article was later reprinted by the LA Times as “In Chicago, Rooftop Farming Is Getting off the Ground” on July 9th. Firozi’s comprehensive overview included quotes from RU professor Mike Bryson, Sustainability Studies Program Director.

More recently, Karis Hustad featured Roosevelt in her latest profile of Chicago universities’ sustainability efforts in this ChicagoInno article, “Want to Check Out Roosevelt’s Sustainability Innovation? Look Up,” published on July 2oth. This article features interviews with RU’s sustainability guru Paul Matthews (Associate VP of Operations and Planning) and Rebecca Quesnell (BA ’15), a recent SUST graduate and now Sustainability Operations Coordinator at Roosevelt.

Posted in alumni, education, faculty, green design, news, publications, Roosevelt, students

RU’s Wabash Building Earns International Honors

Last month RU’s Wabash Building, the LEED-Gold certified “vertical campus” that opened in the fall of 2012, won another major architectural/real estate award. This news release is reprinted from the Roosevelt public relations announcement on 8 June 2015.

Roosevelt's Wabash Building (background) and Auditorium Building (foreground); source: Roosevelt University

Roosevelt’s Wabash Building (background) and Auditorium Building (foreground); source: Roosevelt University

Roosevelt University’s Wabash Building in downtown Chicago has won the 2015 International Real Estate Federation’s World Gold Prix d’Excellence Award at its recent World Congress meeting held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

One of the highest honors given annually to outstanding projects in a variety of categories, the international award recognizes the Wabash Building in the Purpose Built category, specifically for supporting Roosevelt’s mission of social justice as a “learning-living laboratory for sustainability.”

Opened in 2012, the mixed-use 32-story Wabash Building at 425 S. Wabash Ave.,  previously had been selected as the best property in the United States in December 2014 when it received the International Real Estate Federation – U.S. Chapter Grand Prix of Real Estate Award, making the project eligible for its current international recognition.

“It’s a great honor to win an award of such international scope,” said Jon DeVries, director of Roosevelt’s Marshall Bennett Institute for Real Estate. “This award represents Roosevelt’s commitment to sustainable multi-use development in an urban setting and it gives the University strong international exposure to real estate leaders around the globe, introducing us widely to leaders in parts of Europe and Asia,” he said.

Paul Matthews, assistant vice president for campus planning and operations, said the award is another acknowledgement of the University’s commitment to sustainability. “The vertical campus concept in an urban setting is a benchmark that has translated into community action, educational opportunities and outreach to other universities and colleges on the importance of sustainability,” he said.

Designed by the architectural firm of VOA Associates in Chicago, Roosevelt’s Wabash Building has won a number of sustainability awards since its opening, including Gold Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) in Washington, D.C. in late 2012.

“We are very honored by this award,” said Christopher Groesbeck, VOA principal and lead architect of the Roosevelt project. “The Wabash Building presents a sustainable vision of the metropolitan university of the future, a hybrid that has global relevance. We greatly appreciate FIABCI’s recognition,” he said.

Ruth Kruger, president of the FIABCI-USA Chapter, accepted the World Gold Prix d’Excellence Award on May 30 in Kuala Lumpur on behalf of Roosevelt and VOA Associates. Since then, Roosevelt’s award-winning Wabash Building has been generating additional excitement and is on the radar for members of the FIABCI-USA Midwest Chapter’s Chicago Midwest Council.

“It’s been a great pleasure to partner with Roosevelt University and VOA Associates to bring this unique and sustainable building to the attention of the world,” said Ronald Sears, chair of the FIABCI-USA Chapter’s Chicago Midwest Council.

Posted in architecture, awards, green design, news, Roosevelt